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all around the country will be watching and hopefully for them, celebrating. the pakistani taliban says it carried out an attack that left more than 30 dead in the northwest of the country. fighters wearing suicide vests targeted an army checkpoint in the khyber-pakhtunkhwa. 13 soldiers and police officers were killed, as well as 12 attackers. 10 civilians died, including three women and three children in a nearby house. the taliban says the attack was in retaliation for the death of two of their commanders killed in air strikes by unmanned u.s. drones. turkish leftish group dhkpc has claimed responsibility for a bomb attack on the u.s. embassy. the turkish interior ministry says the man entered the country from germany using fake i.d. the u.s. government has advised americans to stay away from diplomatic offices in turkey. egypt's interior ministry vowed to investigate the beating of a protestor on saturday that caused outrage after caught on camera and broadcast live but assurances from the government have done nothing to quell anger. erica wood has more. >> cairo's tahrir square
for smoking a cigarette. that's why the taliban were not that hard to overthrow in 2001, because the people of afghanistan turned against this barbaric code that the taliban were trying to impose. and this is, you know, in iraq and in afghanistan hardly two of the most liberal, cosmopolitan countries in the world. today i suspect you're seeing much the same thing happen in northern mali where the islamists have tried to impose a very brutal code, and i suspect it's not proving very popular. however, the reason why these groups can have end during appeal is because there's not a good alternative. and the problem that we faced, for example, in afghanistan is that brutal and unpopular as the taliban are, the government has often been worse because the government has not delivered any kind of justice. what the government delivers is a decision that goes to the highest bidder. and so that bad as the taliban y be, they're less corrupt. and you will get a more or less honest judgment out of them which will then be enforced with barbaric severity. that's not the ideal that people want, but it may b
by people that said they would be executed for smoking a cigarette. that's where the taliban were not hard to overthrow in 2001 because the people of afghanistan turned against this code the taliban were trying to impose and this is in iraq and afghanistan hardly the most cosmopolitan countries in the world. today i suspect you see much the same thing happened where they tried to impose a very brutal quote and i suspect it's not proving very popular. however, the reason these groups can have the appeal is because there's not a good alternative, and the problem that we face for example in afghanistan is that brutal and unpopular as they are the government has often been worse because the government hasn't delivered any kind of justice. what the government delivers is a decision that goes to the highest bid so as bad as the taliban maybe they are less corrupt and you won't get a more or less honest judgment out of them that will then be enforced to the barbaric severity. that's not the ideal people want but it may be better than the alternative and so i think the challenge we face in the cou
by the taliban has had major surgery and in the u.k. she was airlifted to britain in october after being targeted for promoting growth and education. doctors worked on reconstructing her skull and restoring hearing. they say she is making good progress. successful projects raise awareness and millions of dollars. it does not necessarily help the cause. >> inside a small london shop, something rather peculiar is going on. and walnuts are meeting their doom and one by one. this is a hard edge of their battle against prostate cancer in the u.k. chris adams has the disease and is the trustee for the charity. >> there has been a significant increase in the awareness of prostate cancer. we have not cracked a walnut and yet, but we are working on it. >> smashing nuts may seem like an odd way to fight the disease, but so is growing a mustache or getting a 69-year-old grammy on board or dressing up in costumes to run yourself to exhaustion. these are always charities have chosen to get themselves notice. it is very business minded, and is working. >> they try to build an identity. they are trying to engag
to us and said they were going to renounce themselves from the taliban. and this is how i believe we win the war, for what it's worth. i believe that by lowering the supporters of the taliban and by that and stopping their freedom of movement, we win the war and stop terrorism. so that's what we were trying to do on this mission. but almost immediately upon entering the village, my team was under attack. it was an ambush, and it was big. it didn't take me long to realize that it wasn't a normal ambush. i've been in quite a few fire fights by this time, but it's like at the first of any fire fight it's kind of like the dust comes in, you try to figure out any situation, the dust comes in, you figure it out, and then your training kicks in, and you just start doing your job after about 10 or 15 minutes. but not in this fight. it was like one thing after another started to fail us. and everything started to fall like a house of cards. everything that we relied on in every other fire fight to support us wasn't happening. it was like our mission was falling quickly like a house of cards. and
out secret effort to persuade the taliban to expel bin laden. as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, his wrath was unleashed with an attack on our embassies. did you advise director tenant against this operation? and if so, why? >> i had a conversation with george and that at the time. every single cia manager, george tennant as deputy director of operations at the time, and other individuals at the counter-terrorism center argued against that operation as well because it was not well grounded in intelligence, and its chances of success were minimal. and it was likely that other individuals would be killed. when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my professional advice about whether i thought that operation should go forward. i also was engaged in discussion with the saudi government at the time. and i encouraged certain action to be taken to put pressure on the taliban as well as bin laden. >> i take it that your answer to my question is that you did advise in favor of the cancellation of that operation. >> based on what i ha
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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